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20130318
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in the u.s. it's part of paul's on-going reporting "making sense of financial news." >> that's steve and barrie boehne, they're the leading force in tandem. look at the grace. >> reporter: now what, you may ask, could a surfing star of the 1970s have to do with economics in 2013? >> isn't that great! >> reporter: well, steve boehne's life in the surf, which began at age 12 here in dana point, california, has involved shredding the waves, since 1958, on boards of his own invention. he's the founder and still maker and seller of legendary high end infinity surfboards. >> paul, you can use my board any time. >> reporter: even if his heavy lifting days are over. isn't this kind of a large surfboard? >> yeah, this is bigger than normal. it's a standup surfboard. it's become popular in the last five years. and a lot of the older guys really embraced it at first, because it's a little bit easier because you're already standing up. >> reporter: but these days, boehne's got a bigger problem than gnarly knees. >> 95% of the boards being sold in the world weren't made by us in california who st
of israel in the history of the relationship and to steve's point, let's be clear, the reason israelis end up expecting american presidents to quote/unquote love them is because barack obama's two immediate predecessors did precisely that! bill clinton was in love with the idea of israel. he wrote in his memoirs about rabin "i loved rabin as i've love nod other man." and george w. bush, with all the frustrations with ariel sharon was enamored with him as well. so obama inherited a high bar and, frankly, didn't make his own situation any better. he is not an emoter in chief. he has a tough time connecting so that's point number one, number two, this is a down payment trip. this is not a trip to reassure netanyahu on the palestinian issue or on iran because i don't think there's a way, frankly, to reassure anybody on either of these issues because we don't have an answer to either of them and neither do the israelis. >> rose: so therefore what can netanyahu do for the president? >> it's a really good question? i would argue on the iranian issue the prime minister has to give the president th
unacceptable -- jay carney there. steve, it is a complicated picture. what do we know about what happened and what did not happen? >> it is cloudy. it is hard to make an assessment from here. people who know about these things -- there seems to be a consensus that we should at least be cautious about these claims. -look at the video of the victims, they do not seem to have the injuries that would be consistent with the chemical weapons attack. talking about smelling the chemical agent, you would have needed vast quantities of chlorine, which was used by insurgency in iraq. these experts do not believe -- certainly the rebels and possibly not the syrian government as well -- have the power capacity to deliver chlorine on the scale. >> whether or not this attack happened, clearly, the white house is watching carefully. what do they mean when they say it is totally unacceptable or would be totally unacceptable? >> the white house response has been multilayered and really quite nuanced today. they have, as she said, flatly rejected the suggestion that the rebels carried out a chemical attack.
. >> there is this interesting rift in the republican party right now. i was talking to steve schmidt who said there is a rift between the evangelical base and libertarians, and rand paul, in some ways, is a schizophrenic candidate representing that. >> this week marks the 10th anniversary of the american invasion of iraq that following the 9/11 attacks. a cnn poll says 56% of americans believe it was a mistake. one quarter of them think it is a victory. the bush administration told us we had to get there to get the weapons of mass destruction. president bush said the new regime in iraq would serve as a dramatic and inspiring example of freedom. how did it play out, nina totenberg? >> it played out horribly. when you read the postmortems, a lot of people from iraq and here and policy wonks, many who were supportive of the effort, have come to regret it, and part of the reason is we have changed the balance in the middle east. we had a saddam hussein who was a check on iran. he is gone. there were no weapons of mass destruction and the country is in shambles. >> i have read comments from those who fought there
of this deal? steve forbes is the chairman and editor of chief of forbes media, he joined me from new york. i understand that if you're an investor in spain or italy, you're watching nervously what's happening in cyprus. but if you're a businessman in america or asia, do you really need to care? >> i think so. because we are in a global economy. and what was done to cyprus has been an absolute disaster because any time a country now fears that they might have a financial crisis, first thing people are going to do is start a run on the bank. they're not going to take any chances. and so the germans and the e.u. boesched this thing. the i.m.f., it was done i think for political reasons, the germans did not want to see bailing out russian olegarks in election year but the way they did it was horrible. what they should have done is guarantee at the beginning those 100,000 euro deforests, anything above that they'd get shares in the new bank. you might take a hair cut but normally when a bank goes under, the creditors get shares in a new bank. these guys are just wiped out with no hope of recovery
another game changing supervise high impact thing. the kind of thing that steve jobs was famous for. you know, the stock market has been skittish. consumers who like apple products are looking for something big. maybe it's not in phone maybe it's the long rumored television set. they're working on a super smart watch. they've got to do something. there is pressure on apple. samsung has for several years, i've talked to samsung executives privately in korea and here for several years. they don't care about any other competitor. their aim has been totally a appear al. there's pressure on tim cook and apple to delight the public again with something big. and their next big event is going to be in the spring, juneish, may or june. and we'll see what they do. >> rose: blackberry has a new device coming out. >> i don't think apple feels nearly as much pressure. i don't think it's remotely close. the pressure they feel is from sat sung. >> rose: thank you so much, glad to have you. >> glad to be here. >> walter mossberg from the wall street journal. stay with me. >> rose: i began this trip
's, the decline steepens for the average person. steve trachtenberg is 75. >> i'm still cooking with gas, but i'm not the man i was at 65 or 55. >> solman: even so, trachtenberg thinks traditional retirement at age 65 is too young. >> people live longer now and are healthier longer now. but i think having an age at which the institution and the individual could together decide whether the person ought to retire would be a useful thing. >> solman: trachtenberg says 70 would be a good age to do that. so why does he continue to work at 75? >> well, if we had the conversation, i'd push back. i'd say, no, im still working! >> everybody's situation is different. >> solman: george mason psychology professor lou buffardi is retiring this spring at age 70. but he doesn't think everyone should. >> there are many folks my age and older who are remaining at the university and are some of our very best people. >> solman: sure, says claire potter, but there's a catch. >> i think one of the things you get if you have an aging faculty is, there's a kind of break on innovation that is unnecessar
to within a few of an all-time high. steve leaseman tells us where we go from here. >> the federal reserve voting 11 to 1 to keep its policy in place and purchasing $85 billion a month in treasury and mortgage-backed securities in an effort to drive down long-term interest rates. but the federal reserve chairman in the press conference after the statement came out, suggested that the fed may reduce the amount of monthly purchases if he sees sustained improvement. >> we are seeing improvement. i think one thing we would nee
who commit -- committed suicide. >> that's right, my very close friend of mine in college, steve schneider, similar people, we both grew up, he grew up in ohio, i indiana, both pitchers on the baseball team and we both studied math at harvard. so he was someone i grew close with in college. and sort of observed the degradation in his mental state and it ended with him taking his own life. about seven years ago now. and so yeah it was very difficult process to observe and it certainly built some deep seeded motivation in me to understand what was happening. >> rose: if you were doing all this over, would you go in a different direction? i mean would you have gone into some aspect of life sciences directly rather than coming the way that did you through mathematics and computer science and writing code? wince don't think so. you know, i feel like i studied some life sciences while in college. so i spent some time in courses on neuroscience and computational neuroscience and it seemed clear to me that many of the innovations were going to be happening in the development 6 novel sens
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)